My Librarian Ethics: Opening Prayer

I was all ready to start a series tonight about how I see my responsibilities and moral obligations as a (potential) librarian.  The operative word here, however, is “was.”  Then I had an eight-hour shift at work–which doesn’t sound like much until you take into account that I spent nearly all of it on my feet–and now I’m just too tired.

So instead, I’m going to keep thinking about that series and start writing about it in the near future.  And I’m going to share with you St. Francis’ prayer, which seems like an auspicious beginning.  You’ve probably heard it before–it’s a famous prayer–but it speaks to my feelings on librarianship in several regards.  The most obvious is the way it’s an active request; you aren’t asking God to fix things for you but for Him to give you the strength to fix them yourself.  It’s a prayer concerned with working towards a more just world, something I think librarians can be instrumental in doing.  And it’s a prayer, not just a poem or quotation.  It’s rooted in Catholic theology and a worldview that asks us to reach out to others in ways that reflect God’s glory here on Earth.

Those are all things that come into play for me when I think about my role as a (someday) librarian.  They are all reasons I want to be a librarian and things I think I will feel bound to do when I am a librarian.  And tomorrow or the next day (or whenever), I’ll elaborate on that.  In the meantime, I am going to put my feet up and relax.  ♥

Lord, make me an instrument of your peace,
Where there is hatred, let me sow love;
Where there is injury, pardon;
Where there is doubt, faith;
Where there is despair, hope;
Where there is darkness, light;
Where there is sadness, joy.

O Divine Master,
grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled, as to console;
to be understood, as to understand;
to be loved, as to love.
For it is in giving that we receive.
It is in pardoning that we are pardoned,
and it is in dying that we are born to Eternal Life.

Amen.

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